Thursday, April 3, 2008

Cause Way Thursday
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really!?!?!?!
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- When asked by U.S. News & World Report columnist Deborah Kotz if whether or not Obamamania could actually cause people to lose consciousness, Thomas Swift , the president of the American Academy of Neurology, replied: Yes. Being extremely excited can trigger a sudden large surge of adrenaline and other stress hormones…You might feel lightheaded, clammy, and a bit nauseated before your vision dims and the world goes black.
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PURE fashions
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Modest teen models change fashion one outfit at a time — with dignity
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4/1/2008

The Georgia Bulletin (www.georgiabulletin.org)

ATLANTA, GA (The Georgia Bulletin) - On Sunday, April 20, the Pure Fashion Show, an annual faith-based event, will hit the runways again in style, as it has in Atlanta for the past nine years.

This year, guests will enjoy a show at the Georgia World Congress Center sure to cause a positive stir in the fashion industry. With an emphasis on modesty—mirroring the “Modesty Movement” that says girls can wear cute clothes and still maintain their dignity—Pure Fashion includes more than 60 teen models and emphasizes that real models are role models who know who they are and know that they can “change the culture one outfit at a time!”

The show is scheduled to begin at 2 p.m. in the Georgia Ballroom, and doors open for pre-function activities at 12:30 p.m. The 2008 Pure Fashion Show is expected to draw more than 2,000 attendees, who will be treated to an impressive line-up of entertainment, including performances by Carried Away, a Dove Award-winning Christian group from Tennessee, and Lindee Link, a 13-year-old musician from Peachtree City, who is preparing her first CD in Nashville. A parade of hip, trendy and modest spring fashions modeled by more than 60 teenage girls will round out the event.

As with every year, models began their preparation for the show in September with an entire development program that includes training in etiquette, public speaking, make-up application and modeling.

These young women have also been given a new appreciation for human virtues and values that seem forgotten in recent fashion design and trends.

One such virtue is modesty. “Modesty is more than the way we dress; it is an outward reflection of an interior attitude,” says Brenda Sharman, former Miss Georgia USA and national director of Pure Fashion.

Tickets are $45 per person.
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(Tickets are on sale now via http://tickets.purefashion.com/ordertickets. For more information, go to www.purefashion.com or contact Vivian Heard at vivian.heard@comcast.net or (770) 886-6176, or Rhonda Boyle at rhonda.boyle@gmail.com or (770) 317-6408.)
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This story was made available to Catholic Online by permission of The Georgia Bulletin(www.georgiabulletin.org), official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Atlanta, Ga.

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Ind. lawmakers OK cord-blood banks
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By Brigid Curtis Ayer
4/1/2008

The Catholic Review (www.catholicreview.org)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (The Catholic Moment) - Property tax reform dominated the headlines during the 116th session of the Indiana General Assembly, but two proposals supported by the Indiana Catholic Conference — to encourage adult stem-cell research and limit pornography — soon will become law, too.

AUTHOR - Rep. Peggy Welch (D-Bloomington) authored a bill that would increase access to an ethical source of adult stem cells through the creation of a public umbilical cord blood bank. The law passed on March 13, one day before adjournment.
AUTHOR - Rep. Peggy Welch (D-Bloomington) authored a bill that would increase access to an ethical source of adult stem cells through the creation of a public umbilical cord blood bank. The law passed on March 13, one day before adjournment.

Increasing access to an ethical source of adult stem cells through the creation of a public umbilical cord blood bank is the goal of legislation written by Rep. Peggy Welch (D-Bloomington) which passed on March 13, one day before adjournment.

It requires the state Family and Social Service Ad-ministration (FSSA) to create a governmental nonprofit corporation to establish and run an umbilical cord blood bank; begin an umbilical cord blood donation initiative, and promote public awareness concerning the medical benefits of umbilical cord blood.

The two most common sources of stem cells are embryonic and adult stem cells, but a lesser known source is material discarded after the birth of a child — the umbilical cord, cord blood, placenta and amniotic fluid.

Stem cells also can be taken from adult tissues and organs such as bone marrow, fat from liposuction, regions of the nose and even cadavers.

Welch explained that people will be able to donate cord blood to a public cord blood bank the same way they currently donate blood.

“When a person donates blood, they do so in order that someone else may benefit from it. That would be the same motivation for donating to a public cord blood bank,” she said. “The priority of the cord blood bank would be for transplants, the secondary purpose would be for research.”

Dr. Scott Goebel, who is responsible for cord blood transplants at Riley Children’s Hospital in Indianapolis, said, “We have children and adults in Indiana, as well as around the country, who die each year from the lack of a suitable hematopotentic stem cell (marrow or cord blood) donor, which is both regrettable and correctable with more cord blood banking.”

Two out of 10 cord blood donations are of transplantable quality, but the other eight would have research value.

“What is exciting about this legislation is Indiana will be receiving hundreds of thousands of umbilical cord blood units with postnatal tissue for transplants and research,” Welch said. “The goal is that we will increase the number of transplantable stem cells, help save lives of cancer patients, provide more research quality stem cells and improve the quality of life for Hoosiers both physically and financially.”

Welch said she thinks a public cord blood bank will bring more researchers and significant research dollars to Indiana, and help the economy. The bank would be self-supporting in two to three years from its inception, she estimated.

Private and public umbilical cord blood banks have proven invaluable. Doctors use cord blood cells to treat approximately 70 diseases, mostly anemias or cancers of the blood, such as leukemias and lymphomas.
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